New growth, new faces at New Narrative

We’re very happy to announce two new additions to our expanding team: Mohamed Abdelbaki as Global Project Manager and Head of Middle East, and Katrina Oropel as Director of Business Development.

Mohamed joins New Narrative from Thomson Reuters in Hong Kong, where he acquired nearly a decade of project management experience building multimedia hubs – including Trading Middle East and Trading China – that connected portfolio managers with news and thought leadership across global markets.

Katrina arrives from The Economist Group in Hong Kong, where she led integrated sales initiatives in custom research, events, thought leadership and advertising for a client base of multinationals. Previously, she produced investment forums and other events in Asia for Euromoney Institutional Investor.

In his new role at New Narrative, Mohamed will provide global operational support while also driving the development of New Narrative’s business in the Middle East, where our growing list of clients includes banks, asset managers and leading corporates in the UAE, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait.

Katrina will lead New Narrative’s business development initiatives across Asia and North America among our expanding client base of multinationals, investment banks, asset managers, healthcare and technology firms, and media groups.

Both Mohamed and Katrina bring a wealth of experience to New Narrative, including deep knowledge of the financial and media markets in Asia and the Middle East, and an understanding of how top-tier content and thought leadership shapes the market conversation and helps drive business results. We’re fortunate they both chose to join us at this pivotal time – and we know our clients will benefit from their professionalism and expertise.

Mohamed holds a degree in Financial Management from the Arab Academy of Science & Technology in Cairo and is a native Arabic and English speaker. Katrina holds a BS in International Business, and a Minor in Economics (Honours) from the University of San Francisco.

New Narrative expands with key hire of former Euromoney Managing Editor

HONG KONG/NEW YORK, June 13, 2017 — New Narrative, Asia’s leading custom media agency, today announced that Lorraine Cushnie has joined the firm as a partner in its Hong Kong office.

New Narrative creates custom research, thought leadership, multi-platform editorial content and publishing campaigns for top-tier corporations and media organisations worldwide.

Cushnie, an award-winning financial journalist and editor, has spent 15 years covering financial and professional markets in Europe and Asia. Drawing on her extensive experience in banking, asset management and the legal industry, Cushnie will consult on, devise and execute market-leading content campaigns for New Narrative clients across these sectors.

Cushnie joins from Euromoney Institutional Investor where she was the managing editor for the banking and capital markets group in Asia. Based in Hong Kong, she oversaw the editorial teams and publishing schedule for the company’s financial titles including Asiamoney and GlobalCapital.

While at Euromoney, Cushnie established the first news site dedicated to covering the internationalisation of the renminbi, which now publishes under the brand GlobalRMB and is the leader in its field. She also produced custom reports and content for the region’s leading banks and has been a regular moderator of panels and roundtables at major industry conferences.

Cushnie holds a degree in German from King’s College London and a postgraduate diploma in Newspaper Journalism from City University London for which she received a bursary from the Guardian Media Group.

Cushnie joins at an exciting time for New Narrative which launched an office in New York in February and is expanding its operations in Hong Kong.

“We are delighted to welcome someone of Lorraine’s calibre,” said Joseph Chaney, Hong Kong-based co-founder of New Narrative. “Her joining is a tremendous boost for our team from both the editorial and business development standpoints.

“Since its founding by experienced financial journalists in 2013, New Narrative has shown consistent growth in a wide range of sectors, particularly financial services. Lorraine’s credentials as an experienced journalist and editor mean she is ideally positioned to drive the company’s expansion in this field in Asia and beyond.”

About New Narrative

New Narrative Ltd. (n/n) is a content consultancy and custom media agency founded in Hong Kong in 2013. The firm conceptualises and creates tailor-made content campaigns that drive value for a range of global companies, media organisations and research institutions.

New Narrative partners have decades of experience as senior editors and executives in leading media organisations, reporting on market-leading events and producing insightful commentary and analysis for an audience of senior decision-makers.
Press enquiries:

US:

Glenn Mott, Partner
glenn.mott@new-narrative.com
+1 646 330 3282

Hong Kong:

Joseph Chaney, Partner
joseph.chaney@new-narrative.com
+852 9411 7441

 

New Narrative expands to New York with key hire of former Hearst publishing director

HONG KONG/NEW YORK, Feb 8, 2017 — New Narrative, Asia’s leading custom media agency, today announced the expansion of its operations to North America with the opening of an office in New York City that will be led by Glenn Mott, a former executive editor and publishing director at Hearst.

New Narrative creates custom research and thought leadership, multi-platform editorial content and publishing campaigns for top-tier corporations and media organizations worldwide.

Mott, an award-winning editor, publisher and journalist, joins New Narrative as the founding partner of its North American operation. Mott will draw on his extensive experience and industry network to lead the firm’s North American expansion, as well as the development of new production and distribution solutions that will enhance the reach and impact of client content and media projects.

In his previous role as editor and publishing director for the Hearst newspaper syndicate, Mott oversaw an array of syndication partnerships with global media organizations, including The Guardian, The Toronto Star, Bulls Press, Univision, Tribune Content Agency and Gannett. As publishing director he was responsible for printed book, digital and mobile publishing across all Hearst syndicated features. Mott built a diverse catalogue of titles in all formats covering a broad range of categories, including finance, healthcare, memoirs, travel, food and wine, and graphic art.

In these roles Mott also created syndication and editorial marketing strategies for a broad range of clients, including, The Atlantic, the Gallup Organization, Democracy Now!, Gatehouse Media and Lonely Planet.

Mott is a graduate of the Hearst Management Institute, conducted by the Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management, and Medill School of Journalism. He was a Fulbright Scholar at Tsinghua University in Beijing (2008-09) and a Kathryn Davis Fellow for Peace at Middlebury College (2013).

“Since its founding by experienced financial journalists in 2013, New Narrative has shown consistent growth in a wide range of sectors including professional and financial services, media, healthcare and technology,” said Joseph Chaney, Hong Kong-based co-founder of New Narrative. “In North America, we will expand into new fields such as education and build the highest-quality customized media services for clients in need of tailor-made editorial content, syndication, and press and publication infrastructure.”

“Given his credentials as an executive editor and publisher with deep expertise in multi-platform product creation and development, syndication and media partnerships, Glenn Mott is ideally positioned to lead the company’s North American journey.”
About New Narrative

New Narrative Ltd. (n/n) is a content consultancy and custom media agency founded in Hong Kong in 2013. The firm conceptualizes and creates tailor-made content campaigns that drive value for a range of global companies, media organizations and research institutes.

New Narrative partners collectively have more than 50 years’ experience as senior editors and executives in leading media organizations, reporting on market-leading events and producing insightful commentary and analysis for an audience of senior decision-makers.
Press enquiries:

In the U.S.:

Glenn Mott, Partner
glenn.mott@new-narrative.com
+1 646 330 3282
In Hong Kong:

Joseph Chaney, Partner
joseph.chaney@new-narrative.com
+852 9411 7441

2016: An award-winning finish

We don’t usually blow our own trumpet at n/n; we’re usually too busy helping our clients blow theirs via the content that we create on their behalf. Nevertheless, it’s gratifying that our work sometimes gets recognised, even if by proxy.

In the 2016 International Communications Consultancy Organisation (ICCO) awards, held in London earlier this month, FleishmanHillard Fishburn (FHF) and Ketchum Research took the prize for the World’s Best PR Campaign in the Healthcare sector, for the Philips Future Health Index.

This groundbreaking campaign benchmarked countries’ readiness to meet emerging healthcare challenges by examining perceptions about the accessibility and level of integration of healthcare services, and the adoption of connected care technology. This was based on an ambitious survey of healthcare professionals and patients conducted by a team led by FHF and Ketchum Research.

Where did n/n come in? We analysed the findings and used them to craft the core FHI report, turning the extensive research data into a trenchant and compelling editorial product that contained insights and calls to action for a broad audience of healthcare practitioners, policymakers and experts. Far beyond a simple marketing exercise, this programme puts Philips at the centre of a global discussion that will have profound implications for how countries and populations worldwide address emerging healthcare challenges.

We’d like to extend our congratulations to Philips for recognising the transformative potential of content backed by solid research; FHF and Ketchum for devising a great campaign … and, okay, ourselves. We’ve always believed that our work sets new bars at the highest international levels, and that editorially impeccable content will be increasingly vital to help firms burnish their brands. This is solid evidence that we’re not wrong on either of those counts.

Here’s to an award-winning (and content-rich) 2017!

Inbound (content) marketing: The state of the region

How can you tell content marketing works? When even the marketing companies are using it. The ‘State of Inbound 2016’ report from sales software specialist HubSpot is a good example, and an insightful piece of research in its own right.

HubSpot being an inbound sales platform, the neutrality of its conclusions might be called into question, but the firm’s certainly done some legwork, polling 4,500 marketers globally and 800 in Asia Pacific alone — most non-HubSpot customers in small and mid-sized enterprises. Not surprisingly, the report shows inbound marketing (that is, getting customers to come to you via a website, content or referrals) is far more effective in terms of return on investment than the ‘outbound’ variety (shouting at customers to come to you with display, banner or other types of ads). Here are some of the other key findings from our perspective:

Content is a must — and a struggle

Creating content was the second-biggest inbound marketing priority for Asia-Pacific companies, just under enhancing their website search engine optimisation. But it doesn’t necessarily come easy; nearly a third (31%) saw targeting content for an international audience as a major challenge.

Content can also be exhausting — 66% of marketers said they develop their own content in-house, and almost a quarter (23%) spend four hours or more crafting one short blog post. It’s great that so much thought and care is going into the process, but (depending on subject matter) it really shouldn’t take that long — and can’t, if small marketing teams hope to generate content at a rate (and on a level of quality) to fuel ambitious campaigns and long-term engagement. Simple lack of capacity may result in more enlisting the help of (ahem) outside agencies to support their content needs, which a mere 21% those polled did currently.

Distribution: The classics reign (for now)

While HubSpot concentrated on blogs in this study, next year’s will almost certainly have to encompass video — YouTube and Facebook video were the most popular emerging content distribution channels, with 51% and 40% of those polled respectively planning to add them to their marketing programs in the next 12 months. Instagram was a distant third (28%) while few placed much emphasis on Snapchat (11%) or Vine (5%). This indicates to us that marketers plan to focus their content efforts on a couple of key formats or platforms, and that’s a sound strategy — far better to master one or two distribution channels than to do a half-hearted job of populating all of them.

The study also shows most people continue to draw a line between social and business networking. Only LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter are seen as ‘professional’ platforms; others, including Instagram, WeChat and Weibo, are still used almost exclusively for personal purposes. That doesn’t necessarily mean these channels should be disregarded by businesses, but does suggest that LinkedIn and Facebook are still the places where ‘serious’ content is most likely to connect with decision makers, and have the most impact, particularly in the business-to-business context. This might change as more organisations refine their visual content offerings, or turn their attention to the mainland Chinese market and its homegrown networking platforms.

All in all, it’s encouraging that content and not ad spending is viewing as the new marketing currency, and we look forward to seeing how the results change next year.

A welcome development

We’re very happy to announce today the formal appointment of n/n’s new Hong Kong-based director of business development, Elizabeth Kwong.

A veteran of top-tier media brands such as Asiamoney, Time and the Economist Group, Elizabeth boasts a formidable combination of sales skills and serious publishing and project management chops, and has helped shape content strategies for a range of clients in industries from technology to retail. We expect Elizabeth to play a major role in our future growth (and perhaps keep the rest of us in line in the process).

For more details on Elizabeth and the rest of the expanding team, please see our People page.

Rise 2016: Media-driven brands, or vice-versa?

Many of the events of the second day of RISE, Hong Kong’s tech-startup-focused conference, were devoted to disruption in marketing and media (how could we not attend?) One of the most interesting panels was entitled “The media-driven brand”, but as one panellist noted the discussion could equally have been about “brand-driven media”. Which is driving which? It’s not a new question, but it has become more pointed as traditional publishers struggle to revamp their subscription and advertising-dependent business models, and as companies are producing more high-quality content (which is where, *cough*, we come in) alongside pure brand advertising.

Publishers have traditionally won or lost on the size and quality of their audiences, but now–in competition with behemoths like Facebook and its endless free newsfeed–they face difficult choices about how make their businesses sustainable. “Media needs to be rebooted,” said Rob Fan, co-founder and CTO of Sharethrough, a native advertising platform, on the RISE panel. He cited Buzzfeed, which has parlayed its mass appeal to the digital native crowd into some serious journalism.

Coming at it from the other direction is harder. Traditional publishers will find it hard to build Buzzfeed-level fanbases and are unlikely to see subscriptions or old-style ad sales recover lost ground. Sadly, great content alone is not enough to make them solvent. (Just ask Alan Rusbridger.) There are some innovative attempts out there–including in our home town–to crowdfund news reporting, but however commendable such efforts are, it seems media and brands will have to keep collaborating to make the most out of their target audiences’ evolving proclivities.

One solution–that Mr Fan’s platform was founded to enable–is to allow native advertising; that is, embedding and integrating a brand’s content alongside the publisher’s own. This can help independent publishers survive, Mr Fan claimed, warning that without them we’d risk a world where “everyone is a blogger” and no one does any serious reporting. But there is a risk with native advertising that companies and publishers alike recognise: if it isn’t clearly demarcated, the audience may start to lose trust in the credibility and authority of the publisher–and by extension the brand paying for the content. (The Onion, itself no stranger to the concept, made a good, and very crude, point about this a few years back. Only follow that link–or read The Onion–if you’re not easily offended.)

Trust is hard-won and easily lost. But as another panellist, Lara Setrakian, co-founder and CEO of NewsDeeply, explained, there is a way to build it and simultaneously make high-quality independent publishing sustainable in collaboration with corporate partners. First, and above all, establish that editorial goals are paramount, and do good work. This will generate loyal and passionate communities of followers that companies will want to reach. Then use this experience to create custom projects on related themes. (It’s also a model that The Economist Intelligence Unit has used to good effect when conducting sponsored research.)

Of course this means walking a fine editorial line, but it is one that it pays both media platforms and corporate brands to adhere to–if they want to build trust in their audiences. Ceding a degree of editorial control is uncomfortable for some brands, but given they share with the publisher the objectives of building a sustainable business and pleasing a discerning audience, it’s a step that must be taken.

 

We’re hiring

We’re very pleased to announce we’re seeking the next addition to the n/n team, in the form of a Hong Kong-based director of business development. A full description of the role is below — please e-mail applications or any questions to info@new-narrative.com

Title: Director of Business Development, Hong Kong

New Narrative (n/n) is looking for a dynamic sales director to help scale the company and drive its growth from phenomenal to incredible. With responsibility for new client acquisition as well as deepening relationships with existing clients, the role calls for a dynamic, motivated and confident sales leader eager to grow professionally in—and alongside—an ambitious and rapidly expanding enterprise.

Skills and Experience Required

The successful candidate should have:

— A minimum of five years’ experience in media sales or a senior corporate communications or marketing role

— Experience working in the financial or professional services sectors

— Knowledge of the traditional, new and social media communications strategies of financial and professional services firms

— A deep network of contacts among marketing and communications decision-makers in these industries

— A gregarious personality and a keen desire to expand his or her network of contacts

— Awareness that success depends on timely action and tenacity in adversity

— Fluent English; Cantonese would be an advantage

— The right to work in Hong Kong

Salary

The role offers a generous base salary and attractive commission, based on experience.

New Narrative is an equal opportunities employer.

Making the most of a mountain

So, according to Fortune, computers are taking over the reporting of breaking financial news, and are in some respects better at it than human journalists. As former financial hacks, we saw the early stages of this transformation, and find it both intriguing and slightly troubling. We’d agree that human judgement will always be required to determine what raw numbers actually mean, and to steer clear of the kind of language that might inadvertently sow market panic. But leaving aside the implications for the journalism industry, the article raises an excellent point:

“The role of reporters today should be to act as ‘silo busters’ who can acquire information from diverse sources and present it in context … for journalists, it’s now about connecting, synthesizing and analyzing.”

This, in a nutshell, is how data should be viewed and treated by everyone. With data collection and analytics now vital to any business, most companies generate data as a matter of course that can tell compelling stories about their organisation or industry. However in addressing the media or a wider audience, simply cherry-picking a few figures is unlikely to have much impact, as numbers in isolation are essentially meaningless. For example, sales might have rose 125%, but off what kind of base? And 70% of your customers may be repeat clients, but how does that compare to the industry average?

An organisation that sifts through data to identify and shed light on longer-term trends, however, can use it to position itself as an authority with plenty to say not only about its field, but wider issues. And this applies to just about everybody; a logistics firm, for example, will have intelligence on the state of infrastructure where it operates; an online florist could easily produce some tongue-in-cheek findings on the state of romance in the various markets it ships to. Teasing a story out of data doesn’t necessarily require computer scientists or costly analytics engines; often it’s a more matter of working with the right partners to highlight, repurpose and present existing information in the most engaging possible way. We’ve used company data to develop everything from research reports to ongoing proprietary indexes, which often produce the kind of rankings and headlines that can compete with the most blatant clickbait (with, of course, a lot more class and intellectual heft).

In a crowded content market, intellectual property is one of the most valuable currencies there is — and most companies are sitting on a mountain of it. We’d humbly suggest ‘connect, synthesise, analyse’ works equally well as a mantra for business journalists and the best content programmes.

 

 

You have the pipelines—but who’s pumping the oil?

There’s a deluge of content about creating content out there. Inevitably a lot of it is mediocre (you could say the same about content in any field) but, like the temples hidden around the otherwise aesthetically disastrous city of Kyoto, there are diamonds if you know where to look.

Gartner, where the always dependable Jake Sorofman provides regular, and regularly good, analysis on trends in content marketing, is one such place. We were struck in this post not by the snazzy London-Tube-Style map of digital marketing hubs and channels, but by the first comment on the page, by David H Deans, Texas-based technology, media and telecoms consultant. It’s worth quoting at length—we’ve added emphasis to the bits that really stand out:

I wonder if one of these Hubs will ever really help the typical B2B CMO solve their top challenge in 2016 — that being, digital marketing talent development. Having enough skilled and experienced staff that can ‘create’ meaningful and substantive content is an unattainable goal for way too many B2B marketing leaders.

Case in point: I recent worked with a large software vendor on Cloud market strategy. It typically took their Product Marketing subject-matter experts ~2 months to create a distinctive PowerPoint presentation and ~6 months to create a forward-thinking white paper. Content ideas were never an issue. However, when you asked a meeting of a dozen or more staff “who can start to write the core narrative for this project?” — everybody looks around the room; nobody is confident that they’re qualified.

This puts a common problem—one that New Narrative was founded to help solve—excellently. You might be confident you have all the right pipelines and distribution channels in place, but who’s actually going to create content that your audience wants to read, watch or engage with to fill them?

The issue can be one of training staff, as Mr Deans goes on to note. To be sure, there are many ways you can lead people through the necessary steps to tell better stories, write punchier scripts, design more eye-catching videos, become more confident presenters and so on.

But editorial nous, the kind learned in the newsroom, is harder to pick up. Astute consumers will always spot the artifice in content created by someone who isn’t confident of their own editorial acumen—or who is too beholden to the marketing department. After the pipelines are built, content expertise needs to be brought to bear—and that’s not always something that can be found or fostered internally. As with all strategies, part of a successful approach to content is knowing when to seek outside help.